antioch school

 

For a whole year they met with the church and taught a great many people.

And in Antioch the disciples were first called Christians.

Acts 11:26

UPCOMING COURSES

INTERPRETING THE WORD I

Significant prep work required for before intensive class time

Location: Generations Church, Los Alamitos, CA

Time: Mondays, 6-9p (Sept 18-Dec 19)

Prequisite(s): None required

Facilitator: John Alwood

ACTS

Location: Generations Church, Los Alamitos, CA

Time: Tuesdays, September 19-December 19, 9a-noon

Prequisite(s): None required

Facilitator: TBD

ACTS

Location: Tulare Community Church, Tulare, CA

Time: September 25-December 22, time and day of week to be determined

Prequisite(s): None required

Facilitator: Daniel Teerman

Understanding the Essentials of Doctrine

Location: Generations Church, Los Alamitos, CA

Time: Mondays, 6-9p (Sept 26-Dec. 19)

Prequisite(s): Acts, Pauline

Facilitators: Jeff Ludington & Mike Gunn

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CORE ED SERIES

B.Min. & B.Th. Programs

The Core Education Series is a series of resources designed to lay a solid general education foundation for all students, which will serve as the base from which they can embark on a lifetime of learning. Each course is designed with a selected reader, Socratic discussions around 15 core issues, and projects designed to guide the student in articulating the core issues in his or her own work.

LANGUAGE
The Crucial Connection

The overall objective of this course is to lay a foundation for all courses.  This course deals both with the nature of language and the “globalization language”—English.  It also serves to introduce the student to the development of languages all around the world and to spark interest in learning a second language, which we believe is very important for individuals’ future development.  All future languages are built around the “natural” Rosetta Stone system used by the USA State Department.  In this course, we will learn about linguistics, orality/literacy, how children learn languages, global language history and expansion , and laying a lifelong learning strategy for language development.  It will also develop an appreciation for the power of language—speaking, listening, reading and writing.  The specific objectives are:

  • To understand the history of languages globally
  • To understand the power of language in everyday life
  • To motivate future interest in and development of language skills
  • To spark interest in learning a second language
  • To sketch a future course for personal language development
ART
The Aesthetic Experience

This course is designed to introduce the student to the issue of the relationship of the sciences and the arts in a way that brings balance (Gadamer) to the ability to find truth through both.  We will then survey music, dance, and the visual arts (especially painting and architecture), identifying the common elements of all 9 civilizations, examining how the arts shaped and continue to shape each civilization. The course will conclude with a personal strategy for growing in appreciation for the arts in one’s own culture.  Literature is a form of art, and it is dealt with by many readings in The Harvard Classics reading program integrated into the course.   The specific objectives are:

  • To understand the history of the arts and its power in culture
  • To understand the power of the art in everyday life and on the mind
  • To motivate future personal interest in the arts
  • To spark interest in learning to use the arts in your lifework
  • To sketch a future course for appreciation of the arts
HERITAGE
The Living Past

History can best be grasped by understanding the big picture: the great conversations, the great civilizations, and the philosophical paradigms that drove major eras of world history.  In this course we will survey these civilizations, providing a basic knowledge of the various and colorful civilizations that  make up the 21st century.  By the end of the course, we will attempt to identify the current global questions facing these 9 civilizations as they enter the globalization realities of the 21st century. The specific objectives are:

  • To gain a general understanding of the history and development of civilizations
  • To understand the power of our heritage in shaping everyday life
  • To motivate future interest in our cultural heritage as a tool in shaping our world
  • To spark interest in continued lifelong education in our heritage
  • To sketch a future course use of our heritage in our lifework
NATURE
The Ecology of the Planet

This course will focus on fundamental ideas of the nature of the universe, with special attention to fundamentals of science.  We will focus on the rise of modern science, the great enduring ideas, and the merging of science and technology, thus reshaping the world of the 21st century.  The great ideas of science will be integrated with the Harvard Classics readings, and some attention will be given to future mathematics, the “green revolution,” and global warming issues. Again, the student will be asked to identify areas of future interest, as well as a basic “reading continuum” plan for keeping up with the cultural conversation of the scientific community.  The specific objectives are:

  • To understand the history of the development of the sciences
  • To understand the power of the sciences in everyday life
  • To motivate future interest the growth and development of key issues in the sciences
  • To spark interest in specific scientific debates in the arena of the sciences
  • To sketch a future course for lifelong learning in the sciences
WORK
The Value of Vocation

This course attempts to pull together all the work of the above courses by helping the student begin to identify his or her lifework—a concept far bigger than one’s career.  A good general, liberal education should give a person a broad understanding of the world and all the choices that lie out there for a lifetime of good works.  In addition, Howard Gardner’s book, Good Work, will be a platform for beginning to identify the good work the student would like to major on in his or her lifetime.  The specific objectives are:

  • To understand the value of good work
  • To understand the power of good occupations in seeking the welfare of the city
  • To motivate future interest in and development of becoming a skilled craftsman
  • To spark interest in learning a skill or trade
  • To sketch a future course for lifelong learning in the area of good work and becoming a skilled craftsman
IDENTITY
The Search for Meaning

This course will lead the student through a process of beginning to identify the core elements of his or her worldview.  In a way, this will lead to shaping the “first draft” of one’s life purpose.  Time will be spent on Art Miller’s works on helping us identify our motivated abilities pattern (SIMA), a pattern that is unique to each individual.  The debate of intelligent design will be briefly explored.  Each student will complete the course with an attempt to identify his or her unique contribution to the world during their lifetime.

The specific objectives are:

  • To understand the history of finding meaning and truth in life
  • To understand the power of understanding our identity in everyday life
  • To motivate future interest in and development of self understanding
  • To spark interest in continued learning and development of our self identity
  • To sketch a future course for personal development of a strong self identity

LEADERSHIP SERIES

B.Min., M.Min., D.Min

The Leadership Series is a collection of resources designed to help local church leaders, missionaries, and pastors develop leaders to strengthen and expand the church worldwide. The Leadership Series is unique from other leadership training materials. It incorporates a process of studying together and interacting that develops unity in leadership teams in two ways: (1) one-mindedness around biblical principles and (2) unity around culturally relevant strategies and applications developed together. The process uses biblical readings, readings from over 300 authors from the Church community worldwide, written projects, discussions, and applications. The Leadership Series is an excellent tool for equipping a wide spectrum of church leaders, including those pursuing roles as pastors, missionaries, evangelists, and church planters.

Leadership I Series

B.Min., M.Min., D.Min. C-BTE Programs

Series I is comprised of 15 courses, 4 of which are considered foundational while the other 11 build on that foundation. These courses are designed to help train those who desire to be part of a leadership and ministry team that is one-minded in ministry vision and philosophy. Out of this team would come those who commit themselves long term to local church leadership or those who desire to eventually be part of a missionary team involved in planting or establishing churches in other areas.

ACTS
Keys to the Establishing & Expansion of the 1st C. Church

The overall objective of this course is to determine the fundamental biblical principles regarding the mission of the church and its role in missions, developing guidelines and strategy from these principles for a local church’s involvement. Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Develop a basic understanding of biblical keys to the establishment and expansion of the first-century church and how to use these keys in the establishment and expansion of the twentieth-century global church;

  • Design a model to use as a guide in planting and establishing churches today from the core elements of Paul’s strategy used on his missionary journeys;

  • Determine a biblical definition for “missionary” and “missionary work”;

  • Develop convictions on the role of the local church in missions today and to design a model of how a local church can be central and vitally involved in missions while networking with other churches and mission agencies.
PAULINE EPISTLES

Strategies for Establishing Churches

The overall objective of this course is to determine the fundamental biblical principles for growing and strengthening (establishing) a church to maturity and developing a strategy for implementing the biblical forms and functions of a church necessary for making and keeping it strong.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Develop a biblical understanding of Paul’s concept of establishing local churches, while discerning the difference between what Paul understood to be normative for all churches in every culture and generation and what he intended to be merely cultural for his time and situation;

  • Develop a biblical understanding of how the church fits into the overall plan and eternal purposes of God;

  • Develop a biblical understanding of the philosophy that is to drive the ministry of the church and the guidelines (i.e. “house order”) by which each local church is to abide;

  • Bring all of this biblical understanding together into a contemporary model for establishing local churches in the twenty-first century, including a general procedures consistent with Paul’s establishing model and normative “house order” instructions.
ESSENTIALS
Understanding the Essentials of Sound Doctrine

The overall objective of this course is to build a contemporary didache⎯an early church manual to establish believers in the essentials of the apostles’ teaching.  This contemporary didache must be founded solidly upon the faith delivered by the apostles; seasoned by the historical effort of the church; and be eminently relevant to our present cultural situations.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would do the following:

  • Gain an understanding of the preaching (kerygma) and the teaching (didache) of the apostles the core doctrines and their importance to the churches of every generation, summarizing the doctrines in statement form which will be used as a foundation for all contemporary theological formulations;

  • Write a modern kerygma/didache type doctrinal statement that can be used by churches as a guide for establishing believers in their faith, for doing theology as a community of believers, and for aiding all believers in beginning their own practical theology for everyday life;

  • Gain an appreciation for the historical effort of the church as it has sought, down through the centuries to provide the church of its generation with a relevant understanding and defense of the faith delivered by the apostles.

  • Lay out a strategy for establishing everyone in a local church in both the gospel (kerygma) and the essential teaching of the apostles (the didache), as well as understand how the BILD curriculum grows out of the didache.
LEADERS

Leaders & the Early Church

The overall objective of this course is to bring leadership training back the center of the local church in a way that will empower churches to participate in the expansion of the gospel with the same vision and effectiveness as first church at Antioch.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course will:

  • Develop a basic understanding of leadership in the Early Church with all of its complexities, focusing specifically on the work of ministers of the gospel and that of elders and deacons and how their work is complementary in nature.

  • Rediscover the Antioch tradition of the Early Church, which lasted over five centuries, and design a model for how to build this tradition back into our churches, as we seek to have similar impact globally for the expansion of the gospel in the 21st century

  • Design an effective multi-level leadership development strategy for our churches, which is truly built upon the foundation of the New Testament and which will carry the Antioch vision, of turning the world upside down.
PREACHING
Preaching, Teaching, and Worship in the Early Church

The overall objective of this course is to develop the ability to preach and teach within the five sermonic forms of the Early Church: evangelistic, catechetical, expository, prophetic, and festal.  These forms will be examined in light of the paradigm of the Early Church meeting, which was far more participatory than our single preacher-event approach that has dominated Western protestant churches ever since the Reformation.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Develop a basic understanding of the teaching forms of the Early Church: evangelistic, catechetical, expository, prophetic, and festal, and the importance of each of the forms for the contemporary expansion and establishing of churches worldwide. Special attention will be given to the importance of the reading of Scripture and to a fresh understanding of Paul’s idea of rhetoric.

  • Gain a comprehensive understanding of the five preaching forms of the Early Church and a basic approach to preparing sermons around the five forms, with special attention given to the methods needed to employ the five forms in contemporary preaching and teaching.

  • Introduce the student to the importance of psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs, to the integration of these forms into the life of the church in appropriate cultural forms of worship, designed to enhance the effectiveness and application of these forms in the everyday life of the believers in these churches.

  • Guide the student into the integration of both the preaching forms and worship in the Lord’s  Supper, giving shape to the church gathering as delivered by the Apostles and as observed by almost all churches of the first 300 years of the Early Church.

  • Integrate culturally appropriate forms of both preaching/teaching and worship into a contemporary meeting of the churches in a culture, with a view to creative “civilization” expression of music, drama, and the arts.
SHEPHERDING
Shepherding, Counseling, and the Early Church

The overall objective of this course is to build an comprehensive shepherding strategy for a church, which is rooted in the traditional pastoral care paradigm, drawn from the Scriptures, especially from Paul’s early letters, rather than the secular psychological care paradigm of contemporary culture. Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Develop an understanding of the biblical model of pastoral care practiced in the early churches as a basis for formulating a philosophy of pastoral care which is consistent with New Testament guidelines for living in community and treating problems in our own lives and in our churches.

  • Formulate a clear perspective of the gospel and the work of the Spirit in our lives (from an examination of the message of the gospel in Paul’s early epistles) as a basis for addressing the foundational needs and life-controlling problems of new or unestablished believers.

  • Examine the contemporary practice of integrating psychology and theology, and assess the legitimacy of such an endeavor and its implications for the practice of counseling within the church.

  • Lay necessary foundations for skillfully handling the Scriptures in counseling, and develop convictions regarding the sufficiency of the scriptures in the counseling process.

  • Critique the contemporary emergence of a new Christian profession–Christian psychologists and psychiatrists–and the church’s reliance upon it for pastoral care while examining its implications on biblical authority structures and responsibilities.

  • Design a contemporary and comprehensive pastoral care strategy consistent with the biblical guidelines set forth in the Scriptures for the life of the church and the individual’s growth in the Spirit.
FAMILY

The Family and the Early Church

The overall objective of this course is to understand the idea of the church as a family and the individual family as a “family within a family,” using the implications of this reality to develop strategies for building strong households within the context of the church. Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Contrast the biblical view of the family with that of contemporary western technological society, reviving the biblical orientation of the family as a “family within a larger family,” the local church.

  • Examine Paul’s “household texts” to develop an understanding of the nature and character of the “family within a family,” orienting our households toward the building of Christ’s church.

  • Examine specific implications of how a family should live in community (the larger family–the local church) in those areas which are of immediate concern to both the larger family (the local church) and the individual family unit (such as divorce, care of older widows, etc.).

  • Build a guide for functioning as a “family within a family,” promoting harmony with God’s order for the larger family and freeing the family and the believing community to become all that God intended.
EVANGELISM
Evangelism and the Early Church

The overall objective of this course is to develop and implement a household strategy for reaching unbelievers with the gospel and incorporating them into the life of the church, based on biblical principles and patterns for the home and the church. Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Take a fresh look at evangelism through the eyes of the early church, looking for insights into their effectiveness and boldness, as well as identifying patterns which can serve as guides and models for today.

  • Integrate the insights of the first-century church drawn from Acts with the mandates and exhortations of the Epistles to formulate a guide or model which can serve as an aid to shape our twenty-first-century strategies.

  • Define the essentials of the gospel message, package them in a way that they can easily be shared with a nonbeliever, and develop a core set of answers to all the basic questions non-believers ask concerning the validity of our faith.

  • Think through the issue of establishing a new convert in their faith, and study the role of baptism in this process in order to design a plan for incorporating a new believer into the life of a believing community–a local church.

  • Design and implement a home-based evangelism strategy for your own household, and design a generic strategy which could serve as a guide for any local church in developing evangelism strategy at a corporate level.
HABITS

Habits of the Heart

The overall objective of this course is to determine the necessity of every believer embracing sound doctrine in the habits that undergirds life and ministry, coming to conviction regarding its role in the lifelong pursuit of purity and wisdom. Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Discover the root causes and effects of the present-day separation and fragmentation that has taken place within and between the “devotional life” and serious “theological studies.”

  • Examine the life of the early church, identifying the habits and personal disciplines necessary for increasing soundly in faith as individuals and as churches, being protected from the constant infiltration of unsound doctrine.

  • Identify the “core habits of the heart” which ministers of the gospel and spiritual leaders must maintain in order to visibly progress in the Scriptures in a sound manner, and to identify the general development phases characteristic of most leaders, sketching a lifelong strategy for growth and development.

  • Sharpen reading skills and develop a guide for a building a lifelong reading program.

  • Design a strategy for a church in which corporate, family, and individual habits are modeled and practiced in an orderly and natural manner.
CHARACTER

Character of the Leader

The overall objective of this course is to understand the biblical idea of qualified leadership and to determine the fundamental biblical guidelines for character formation in leaders and in the household of God. Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Develop a conviction as to the reason for and the benefit of mature character as motivation for pursuing these character qualities personally, as a family, and as a church.

  • Gain a clear understanding into the character qualities required of mature leaders and of mature men and women within the church, and how these qualities relate to the roles and functions of men and women within the church.

  • Perform personal evaluations and design plans for developing and/or strengthening character qualities which would enhance overall growth and character development.

  • Be able to help other leaders and/or members of the church design a plan for long-term spiritual growth and character development as they pursue their responsibilities within the church community.
PRIORITIES

Ministry Priorities & Personal Management

The overall objective of this course is to create a life-management strategy founded on biblical principles and focused on a central life purpose that will guide each person to be an effective steward of his or her God-given priorities and responsibilities. Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Review and summarize God’s purpose for the church in this age and write a unifying philosophy-of-life statement to be used as a guide in setting goals and building a personal management system.

  • Develop an understanding of the priorities and responsibilities that God set forth for the proper functioning of His household, and our individual households, and how this proper functioning contributes to the building of His church.

  • Set lifelong goals, and build and implement a priorities management system out of the “house order” instructions of the Pastoral Epistles.
PERSPECTIVES

Conflicts Without and Fears Within

The overall objective of this course is to develop a biblical perspective of life and ministry as the guiding force for standing firm in the ministry, skillfully and resolutely addressing the problems and problem people within the church. Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Study Paul’s letters to the Corinthian church and his instructions to Timothy and Titus to gain insight into a “realistic” perspective of ministry.

  • Formulate a description of the ministry and perspectives one should have of the ministry based on the study of Paul’s Corinthian and Pastoral letters.

  • Examine personal ministry attitudes and perspectives, and test these against Paul’s description of the ministry and a minister, in order to reshape personal perspectives around his teaching and example.

  • Make specific commitments and strategies related to personal perspective in ministry which will be a guide for long-term development and involvement in the church and its mission in the world.
INTERPRETING I

Interpreting the Word I: Principles & Procedures

The overall objective of this course is to gain skills and insights for identifying the author’s intention for writing as it is expressed in the text he has written as the determinant of meaning.  Then, out of that meaning, the objective is to determine the significance of that text for today.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Develop a basic conviction in the importance of handling the Word accurately, paying careful attention to the author’s intended meaning as expressed in the text as the determinant of meaning rather than our own preconceptions.

  • Gain a basic grasp of the discipline of hermeneutics (the art of interpretation), thus equipping the student with the foundational principles essential in interpreting and validating the author’s intended meaning expressed in the text, as well as translating its relevancy to the twenty-first century.

  • Gain a basic grasp of the discipline of exegesis (basic procedures for studying and interpreting the Scriptures) as well as a basic proficiency level which demonstrates an ability to accurately draw out the author’s intended meaning from the text and relate it to the twenty-first century.
INTERPRETING II

Interpreting the Word II: Linguistics, Languages, & Study Aides

The overall objective of this course is to develop the ability to skillfully use Hebrew and Greek in the interpreting, preaching and teaching of the Word, using the advancement of linguistics and computer technology, as opposed to the traditional classical seminary approach of spending 2–4 years learning the language itself.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would do the following:

  • Develop a basic understanding of linguistics, which applies to any language, with special attention being given to how to develop a functional equivalency between Hebrew and Greek and the language to which one is translating the Bible, as well as the specific skill of determining the semantic range of words.
  • Gain a basic understanding of both Hebrew and Greek linguistics (in essence identifying the unique characteristics of the Hebrew and Greek languages beyond those of any language), followed by an introduction toThe Translator’s Handbooks—Old and New Testaments (55 volumes), created to guide an English translator in applying general language and Hebrew and Greek linguistic principles in accurately translating the Bible into another language.
  • Introduce the student to the Logos4 Library System, with an impressive array of Greek and Hebrew tools, and how to use the exegetical and passage guides to make full use of Hebrew and Greek in the interpretive process.
  • Guide the student in building a digital library appropriate to the level of biblical study needed, as well as provide an extensive review of Hebrew and Greek tools, commentary sets, and reference works needed at various stages of development as a leader.
  • Integrate the skills of this course back into the work of Interpreting the Word I: Principles and Procedures and Preaching, Teaching, and Worship in the Early Church, in a way that brings a mastery to the whole process of developing a hermeneutically trained judgment and to the process of study and preaching and teaching.
COVENANTS

Covenants, Unity of Scripture & Biblical Worldview

The overall objective of this course is to understand the basic message of the Scriptures and the major motifs of both testaments as a basis for developing a lifeview that is consistent with God’s plan and purposes. Specifically, this means that each person studying the courses would:

  • Design an approach to studying the whole counsel of God and discovering, systematizing and articulating its central message.

  • Summarize the basic message of the Scriptures, including keys strands (i.e. themes, motifs) and/or historical movements, in the form of a basic statement, summarized in a chart or graph.

  • Surface the basic issues of tension between the Old and New Testaments, studying the basic lines of continuity and discontinuity between the Testaments on each issue.

  • Translate the central message of the Bible into a “worldview manifesto” which can serve as a guide for our lives, bringing our life direction and goals into harmony with this world view.

Leadership II Series

B.Th., M.Th., D.Min. TIC Programs

Series II is comprised of 10 courses primarily designed to further train “pastoral-type” leaders––gifted equippers of Ephesians 4:11––who are given local church responsibility and ministry responsibility and ministry responsibility extending beyond the local church level. Series II courses are divided into three groups, each focusing on developing a biblical theology from the Scriptures and applying that biblical theology in culture.

THEOLOGY IN CULTURE

Toward a Theology in Culture

The overall objective of this course is to develop a church-based approach to the task of mastering the Scriptures and then to bring them to bear on the life and problems of churches who are living and ministering in their cultures and to be able to do so at a critical level—that is at a level of awareness of the immediate cultural and global trends that bear on the shaping of men’s worldviews.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Develop a firm conviction of the need for the church to return to the center of the theological enterprise; and the importance of the study of theology to the life of the leaders and the communities of faith themselves, so that they can address cultural and global issues with clarity and relevance— both as a form of kerygma (proclamation of the gospel) and of didache (teaching).

  • Develop a clear understanding of what Paul meant by the perpetual passing on of the deposit, and what the role of getting in-depth training and developing critical thinking by faithful men, is over an extended period of time, with the view that these faithful men would keep churches, and whole movements of churches on course, thus creating a perpetual preservation of the apostles’ doctrine.

  • Develop an understanding of theological encyclopedia (what ought a minister of the gospel to study and in what order); and develop an integrated approach to the theological disciplines which will allow a logical and effective access to existing resources.

  • Gain an understanding of the tremendous shifts that are taking place in theological studies at this time in history, and the different traditions which are attempting to become the dominant new paradigms; and to develop a method for building a belief framework and doing theology in culture, which is both culturally relevant and remains true to the apostolic faith.

  • Develop the perspective and method for guiding others to build their own belief framework and begin build a contemporary belief framework in his own cultural setting, including an extensive doing categorization for doing theology on an ongoing basis within that framework; as well as theology in their cultures.
LAW

Old Testament Theology: The Law

The overall objective of this course is to lay the foundation for a lifetime of work in the Pentateuch, introducing the student to all of the essential processes and resources necessary to frame in a biblical theology of the Pentateuch, and to a process of moving from biblical theology to theology in culture.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Develop an overall understanding of the Pentateuch—including the development of a canonical intent statement that integrates Moses’ intention and literary design for the Pentateuch and the role the Pentateuch plays in relation to the other sections of the Old Testament canon.

  • Develop skill in handling the special literature of the Pentateuch—majoring on the unique combination of narrative and legal literature, as well as paying attention to the over-arching role that the covenant forms-of-the-day played in shaping major sections of the Pentateuch.

  • Develop an author’s intention statement for each book that pays careful attention to the literary design; develop a theology of each book that develops the author’s emphasis of crafting his theological ideas.

  • Develop a theology of the Pentateuch as a whole that, again, respects the literary design of the Pentateuch and identifies the careful crafting of the author’s theological ideas, identifying both themes and rhemes.

  • Develop a framework for beginning to use the Pentateuch in both life and ministry—including framing in a couple of future series ideas for preaching from the Pentateuch.
FORMER PROPHETS

Old Testament Theology: The Former Prophets

The overall objective of this course is to lay the foundation for a lifetime of work in the Former Prophets, introducing the student to all of the essential processes and resources necessary to frame in a biblical theology of the Former Prophets and to a process of moving from biblical theology to theology in culture.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course will:

  • Develop an overall understanding of the Former Prophets—including the development of a canonical intent statement that integrates the overall intention and literary design for the Former Prophets as a canonical section and the role the Former Prophets play in relation to the other sections of the Old Testament canon.

  • Develop skill in handling the special literature of the Former Prophets—majoring on the unique concept of theological history as well as dealing with chronological material.

  • Develop an author’s intention statement for each book—that pays careful attention to the literary design; develop a theology of each book—that develops the author’s emphasis of crafting his theological ideas.

  • Develop a theology of the Former Prophets as a whole—that again, respects the literary design of the Former Prophets as a section of the Old Testament canon and identifies the careful crafting of the author’s theological ideas, identifying both themes and rhemes.

  • Develop a framework for beginning to use the Former Prophets in both life and ministry—including framing in a couple of ideas for preaching from the Former Prophets in future series.
LATTER PROPHETS

Old Testament Theology: The Latter Prophets

The overall objective of this course is to lay the foundation for a lifetime of work in the Latter Prophets, introducing the student to all of the essential processes and resources necessary to frame in a biblical theology of the Latter Prophets and to a process of moving from biblical theology to theology in culture.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course will:

  • Develop an overall understanding of the Latter Prophets—including the development of a canonical intent statement that integrates the overall intention and literary design for the Latter Prophets as a canonical section and the role that the Latter Prophets play in relation to the other sections of the Old Testament canon.

  • Develop skill in handling the special literature of the Latter Prophets—majoring on both prophetic literature and the prophetic speech form that the prophets used to legally indict Israel.

  • Develop an author’s intention statement for each book—that pays careful attention to the literary design; develop a theology of each book—that develops the author’s emphasis of crafting his theological ideas.

  • Develop a theology of the Latter Prophets as a whole—that again, respects the literary design of the Latter Prophets as a section of the Old Testament canon and identifies the careful crafting of the author’s theological ideas, identifying both themes and rhemes.

  • Develop a framework for beginning to use the Latter Prophets in both life and ministry—including framing in a couple of ideas for preaching from the Latter Prophets in future series.
WRITINGS

Old Testament Theology: The Writings

The overall objective of this course is to lay the foundation for a lifetime of work in the Writings, introducing the student to all of the essential processes and resources necessary to frame in a biblical theology of the Writings and to a process of moving from biblical theology to theology in culture.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course will:

  • Develop an overall understanding of the Writings, including the development of a canonical intent statement that integrates the overall intention and literary design for the Writings as a canonical section and the role the Writings play in relation to the other sections of the Old Testament canon.

  • Develop skill in handling the special literature of the Writings, majoring on poetry, pastoral, and wisdom literature, which the authors used to shape their books in this colorful section of the Old Testament

  • Develop an author’s intention statement for each book, which pays careful attention to the literary design; develop a theology of each book, which develops the author’s emphasis of crafting his theological ideas.

  • Develop a theology of the Writings as a whole that, again, respects the literary design of the Writings as a section of the Old Testament canon and identifies the careful crafting of the author’s theological ideas, identifying both themes and rhemes.

  • Develop a framework for beginning to use the Writings in both life and ministry, including framing in a couple of ideas for preaching from the Writings in future series.
PAUL & LUKE

New Testament Theology: The Pauline Epistles & Luke-Acts

The overall objective of this course is to lay the foundation for a lifetime of work in the Pauline Epistles and Luke-Acts, introducing the student to all of the essential processes and resources necessary to frame in a biblical theology of the Pauline Epistles and Luke-Acts, and to a process of moving from biblical theology to theology in culture.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Develop an overall understanding of the Pauline Epistles and Luke-Acts, including the development of a canonical intent statement that integrates the authors’ intention and literary design and the role this literature plays in relation to the other sections of the New Testament canon.

  • Develop skill in handling the special literature of the Pauline Epistles and Luke-Acts—majoring on the unique combination of Graeco-Roman letters and biography, as well as paying attention to the over-arching role that Luke-Acts  played in shaping the Pauline corpus.

  • Develop an author’s intention statement for each book, which pays careful attention to the literary design; develop a theology of each book, which develops the author’s emphasis of crafting his theological ideas.

  • Develop a theology of Luke-Acts as a whole, which again, respects the literary design and identifies the careful crafting of the author’s theological ideas, identifying both themes and rhemes.

  • Develop a framework for beginning to use the Pauline Epistles and Luke-Acts in both life and ministry, including framing in a couple of future series ideas for preaching from the Pauline Epistles and Luke-Acts.
PETER JAMES & JUDE

New Testament Theology: 1 & 2 Peter, James, Jude, & Hebrews

The overall objective of this course is to lay the foundation for a lifetime of work in Peter, James, Jude, and Hebrews, introducing the student to all of the essential processes and resources necessary to frame in a biblical theology of Peter, James, Jude, and Hebrews and to a process of moving from biblical theology to theology in culture.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Develop an overall understanding of Peter, James, Jude, and Hebrews, including the development of a canonical intent statement that integrates the entire “Catholic collection” of Peter, James, Jude, and Hebrews and the role that Peter, James, Jude, and Hebrews play in relation to the other sections of the New Testament canon.

  • Develop skill in handling the special literature of Peter, James, Jude, and Hebrews—majoring on the unique combination of Graeco-Romans letters, as well as paying attention to the over-arching role that canonical process played in the overall shaping of Peter, James, Jude, and Hebrews.

  • Develop an author’s intention statement for each book, which pays careful attention to the literary design; develop a theology of each book, which develops the author’s emphasis of crafting his theological ideas.

  • Develop a theology of Peter, James, Jude, and Hebrews as a whole, which again, respects the literary design of Peter, James, Jude, and Hebrews and identifies the careful crafting of the author’s theological ideas, identifying both themes and rhemes.

  • Develop a framework for beginning to use Peter, James, Jude, and Hebrews in both life and ministry, including framing in a couple of future series ideas for preaching from Peter, James, Jude, and Hebrews.
MARK & MATTHEW

New Testament Theology: The Gospels of Mark & Matthew

The overall objective of this course is to lay the foundation for a lifetime of work in the Gospels of Mark and Matthew, introducing the student to all of the essential processes and resources necessary to frame in a biblical theology of the Gospels of Mark and Matthew and to a process of moving from biblical theology to theology in culture.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course will:

  • Develop an overall understanding of Mark and Matthew, including the development of a canonical intent statement that integrates the overall intention and literary design for Mark and Matthew as a canonical section and the role that Mark and Matthew play in relation to the other sections of the New Testament canon.

  • Develop skill in handling the special literature of Mark and Matthew, majoring on the gospel genre and the interpretation of parables.

  • Develop an author’s intention statement for each book, which pays careful attention to the literary design; develop a theology of each book, which develops the author’s emphasis of crafting his theological ideas.

  • Develop a theology of Mark and Matthew as a whole, which again, respects the literary design of Mark and Matthew as a section of the New Testament canon and identifies the careful crafting of the author’s theological ideas, identifying both themes and rhemes.

  • Develop a framework for beginning to use Mark and Matthew in both life and ministry, including framing in a couple of ideas for preaching from Mark and Matthew in future series.
JOHN

New Testament Theology: John; 1,2,3 John; Revelation

The overall objective of this course is to lay the foundation for a lifetime of work in John’s writings, introducing the student to all of the essential processes and resources necessary to frame in a biblical theology of the Johannine literature and to a process of moving from biblical theology to theology in culture.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course will:

  • Develop an overall understanding of John’s writings—including the development of a canonical intent statement that integrates the overall intention and literary design for the Johannine literature as a canonical section and the role that John’s writings play in relation to the other sections of the New Testament canon.

  • Develop skill in handling the special literature of John—majoring on the gospel genre and the interpretation of apocalyptic literature.

  • Develop an author’s intention statement for each book—that pays careful attention to the literary design; develop a theology of each book—that develops the author’s emphasis of crafting his theological ideas.

  • Develop a theology of the Johannine literature as a whole—that, again, respects the literary design of John as a section of the New Testament canon and identifies the careful crafting of the author’s theological ideas, identifying both themes and rhemes.

  • Develop a framework for beginning to use the Johannine literature in both life and ministry—including framing in a couple of ideas for preaching from John’s writings in future series.
THEOLOGY IN CIVILIZATION

Pathways to Constructing Theology in Civilization

In this complex time of conflict of civilizations and the remaking of world order, the overall objective of this course is to develop the ability to do comprehensive theology work in the context of civilization, with the view of developing a comprehensive theology that will empower churches to address in a fresh and relevant manner core issues of one’s civilization—both engaging the culture in the “great conversation” with the God of the universe and impacting the culture with the gospel of Jesus Christ.  Specifically, this means that each person studying the course would:

  • Develop a basic understanding of the restructuring of civilization in light of the expansion of the gospel to the Global South in the late 20th and early 21st century, with the view of developing serious, global theology expressions relevant to the church of the new millennium.

  • Gain an understanding of the formation and influencing power of cultural conversations and intellectual change in the context of civilizations as a paradigm for cultural formation and development, with a view of understanding the times and its presenting opportunities for the church of the 21st century.

  • Identify the great ideas and debates of an emerging civilization or rearticulate those of an existing civilization, with the view of churches identifying the issues that need to be theologically addressed in their church network, so that churches become a powerful force in shaping the theological and cultural conversation.

  • Develop the ability and agenda for entering the theological conversation of his or her civilization through serious and sustained habits of reflection by churches, through national seminars and courses, with special focus on the media, movies, and the worldwide web (www).

  • Develop ideas and accompanying pathways for shaping the conversation of his or her faith community, of the theological community in general, and of the conversation of the civilization at large.